Rosiglitazone For Type 2 Diabetes Does Not Increase Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death But Increases Heart Failure And Fractures In Women

June 9, 2009

Using rosiglitazone (Avandia) in combination with standard diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. However, the study confirms that using rosiglitazone more than doubles the risks of heart failure, and also increases the risk of fractures, mainly in women. The findings of the RECORD study are published in an Article Online First and in an upcoming edition of Read the rest of this entry »

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Combination Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes With Rosiglitazone (RECORD Study) Shows No Increase Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death

June 6, 2009

The results of the RECORD study are reported in an article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet. The findings are presented at the same time at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in New Orleans, USA. They indicate that the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) together with regular diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to reduce blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not raise the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. On the other hand, the research establishes that using rosiglitazone multiplies by more than two the risk of heart failure, and increases the risk of fracture, mostly in women.
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Combination Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes With Rosiglitazone (RECORD Study) Shows No Increase Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death

June 6, 2009

The results of the RECORD study are reported in an article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet. The findings are presented at the same time at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in New Orleans, USA. They indicate that the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) together with regular diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to reduce blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not raise the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. On the other hand, the research establishes that using rosiglitazone multiplies by more than two the risk of heart failure, and increases the risk of fracture, mostly in women.
Read the rest of this entry »


Policies On Organ Donation After Cardiac Death Vary Considerably Among Children’s Hospitals

May 16, 2009

Although a large number of children’s hospitals have developed or are developing policies regarding organ donation after cardiac death, there is considerable variation among policies, including the criteria for declaring death, according to a study in the May 13 issue of JAMA.

Donation after cardiac death (DCD) potentially permits patients who do not meet the neurological criteria for death to donate solid organs. “Controlled DCD occurs following planned withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, and uncontrolled DCD occurs after unanticipated cardiac arrest. Potential controlled DCD donors include patients with irreversible catastrophic brain injury or end-stage neuromuscular diseases,” the authors write. Although the Joint Commission requires all hospitals to address DCD, little is known about actual hospital policies.
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BMI And Increased Death Rates: Hazards Comparable To Smoking

March 21, 2009

On March 18, 2009, The Lancet posted on its website a prepublication of a worldwide collaborative analysis of body mass index (BMI) and increased death rates among 900,000 adults in 57 prospective studies. Florida Atlantic University researcher Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., the first Sir Richard Doll Research Professor in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Biomedical Science, served as a major investigator in two of the large scale studies, and enrolled and followed approximately 144,000 adults. The analyses were led by the Clinical Trial Service Unit at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom where Sir Richard Doll was the Regius Professor of Medicine and Hennekens is a Visiting Fellow. Hennekens was the founding principal investigator of the Physician’s Health Study composed of approximately 22,000 physicians, and the cardiovascular component of the Nurses Health Study composed of approximately 122,000 nurses.
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Alzheimer’s Patients On Antipsychotics Have Nearly Double Death Risk

January 19, 2009

A new study sponsored by the UK Alzheimer’s Research Trust concluded that antipsychotic drugs commonly prescribed to Alzheimer’s patients in the UK nearly doubles their risk of death over three years.

The study was led by Professor Clive Ballard of King’s College London and was published in The Lancet Neurology on 9 January.

For the study, Ballard and colleagues recruited 165 residential care home patients with Alzheimer’s disease who were on prescription antipsychotic drugs. 83 of them continued to take the real drugs while 82 continued with placebos.
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Improved Access To Safe Abortion Needed To Reduce Maternal Death Rate In Ghana, Advocate Says

January 11, 2009

Ghana’s government should increase efforts to encourage safe abortion procedures and provide reproductive health education to reduce its maternal mortality rate, Jehu Appiah — country director of Ipas Ghana — said in a recent speech during an advocate training meeting at the University of Ghana, Ghana’s Statesman reports. According to Appiah, unsafe abortion procedures account for 30% of maternal deaths in Ghana. Many Ghanaians overlook the 1985 law that legalized abortion, Appiah said, adding that government enforcement is needed to ensure safe access to abortion procedures. Appiah said cultural and religious beliefs also contribute to maternal deaths from unsafe abortions. He added that women often “opt for abortion whenever they get pregnant” and “use all sort of means to just get rid of the pregnancy because of public ridicule.”
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