Researchers Develop An Intelligent Chip Which Regulates Diabetes

June 7, 2009

Scientists of the Electronic Technology group of the University of Seville (US), led by Professor José Manuel Quero, have completed the first phase of Mireia, a research project financed by the Plan Nacional del Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (National Plan of the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry), whose aim is to develop an intelligent chip to regulate diabetes in any kind of patients suffering this disease.

With this research, the idea is to extract the interstitial liquid with micro needles that are 200 microns long (the double than a hair’s thickness). This painless process is carried out with sensors and micro fluidics and patients are informed every now and again in their mobiles of their level of glucose.
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Researchers Develop An Intelligent Chip Which Regulates Diabetes

June 7, 2009

Scientists of the Electronic Technology group of the University of Seville (US), led by Professor José Manuel Quero, have completed the first phase of Mireia, a research project financed by the Plan Nacional del Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (National Plan of the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry), whose aim is to develop an intelligent chip to regulate diabetes in any kind of patients suffering this disease.

With this research, the idea is to extract the interstitial liquid with micro needles that are 200 microns long (the double than a hair’s thickness). This painless process is carried out with sensors and micro fluidics and patients are informed every now and again in their mobiles of their level of glucose.
Read the rest of this entry »


Inventors Develop Novel Technique To Help Customize, Enhance The Effectiveness Of Bladder Cancer Treatment

May 18, 2009

Researchers in the University of Virginia Department of Urology have developed a novel method that could help physicians determine the best course of treatment for patients suffering from bladder cancer.

Bladder cancer is typically treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a treatment in which chemotherapy is administered to reduce the size of the cancer prior to surgery, with the two most commonly used chemotherapeutic regimens being M-VAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin and cisplatin) and GemCis (gemcitabine and cisplatin). While M-VAC has long been considered the more potent regimen and is often offered as the gold standard for treatment, it is quite toxic and known to successfully treat only about 25 percent of patients who receive it. Recent studies in metastatic cancer suggest that GemCis is equally potent and may be better tolerated among patients; thus, it is commonly used in the neoadjuvant setting.
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Scientists Develop Mathematical Model To Predict The Immune Response To Influenza

May 15, 2009

Researchers at the University of Rochester have developed a mathematical model to predict immune responses to infection with influenza A viruses, including novel viruses such as the emergent 2009 influenza A (H1N1). This model examines the contributions of specific sets of immune cells in fighting influenza A virus. The model also helps predict when during the immune response to viral infection antiviral therapy would be most effective.

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Information on Tazarotene for Psoriasis

April 15, 2009

Question:

I am having psoriasis on Betamethasone cream with Salicylic acid. Recently my dermatologist asked me to use Tazarotene cream in the night and Betamethsone cream with Salicylic on morning. I would like to know about the newer cream of Tazoretene. Can you guide me? Leaflet says it is Vitamin D.

Answer:

While vitamin D compounds can be used to treat psoriasis, Tazarotene is actually related to vitamin A. Compounds related to vitamin A are also known as retinoids. Tazarotene and other retinoids can change the way cells in the skin grow and develop. They can normalize the cells and reduce markers of inflammation.

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Damage to veins from Demerol injections

April 15, 2009

Question:

There seems to be damage done to a number of veins from demerol injections done intraveneously. The veins seemed to “harden” and appear to be closed. Will they clear themselves over time, and could this hardening cause high blood pressure?

Answer:

Without knowing more information about frequency of use and when the change to the vein took place, it’s difficult to know and explain the hardening. Some drugs can cause irritation and inflammation of the vessels. This is generally acute and resolves quickly. Other changes related to the repeated use of the same vein may take longer to resolve.

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Does Phentermine Contain Iodine?

April 15, 2009

Question:

I had a total thyroidectomy 2 years ago due to cancer and gained 30 pounds. My doctor placed me on Phentermine to reduce weight. I begin low-iodine diet next Monday in preparation for a whole body scan. I emailed the doctor but did not receive a response. Does Phentermine contain iodine or can I remain on it for the 3 weeks of the diet?

Answer:

Thank you for visiting NetWellness. There is not an iodine component to phenteramine. Sometimes there are fillers and binders that are contained in a medication, in which case your local pharmacist would be the best person to provide this information to assist you as the medication will differ by the manufacturer.

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