Oregon Department Of Human Services Selects APS Healthcare To Manage Expanded Statewide Medicaid Program

June 1, 2009

APS Healthcare, a leading provider of specialty healthcare solutions, has been selected by the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Medical Assistance Programs, to manage its statewide Medicaid disease and medical care management programs. The integrated program will assist Oregon’s Medicaid and SCHIP fee-for-service clients to access healthcare, minimize catastrophic health events and improve health outcomes through education and interventions that help promote behavior change.
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Papers Examine Effects Of Expanded Eligibility In Public Health Insurance Program For Older Children, Medicare Spending; More

January 16, 2009

“Has Public Health Insurance for Older Children Reduced Disparities in Access to Care and Health Outcomes?” Journal of Health Economics: The paper examines the effects of expanding public health insurance programs for older children. The paper analyzes data from the National Health Interview Survey from 1986 to 2005 and finds that income became a less important predictor of the health statuses of children ages nine to 17 in recent years. In addition, the report finds that while eligibility for public health insurance programs improves current utilization of preventive care, it has little effect on a person’s current health status. In addition, the paper finds some evidence that Medicaid eligibility in early childhood has positive effects on future health, which suggests that early and adequate care puts children on a course for better health as they grow (Currie et al., Journal of Health Economics, December 2008).
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HIV Testing Should Be Expanded Nationwide, Editorial Says

January 16, 2009

The “fear factor” regarding HIV testing at the “dawn of the AIDS scourge” more than 20 years ago “hamstrung a valuable tool in containing” the epidemic in the U.S., a San Francisco Chronicleeditorial says.

People who receive HIV diagnoses “can be treated with life-extending drugs, which carry the added plus of limiting transmission,” the editorial says, adding that “informed patient[s] will be less likely to pass on the virus.” The editorial says that it “makes sense” for HIV screening to “be a routine part of medical exams” because if the virus is caught “early,” patients and their partners will “benefit.” According to the editorial, this “commonsense idea already has traction in California, where health insurers are now obliged to cover testing under a law signed in October.” In addition, a new policy in San Francisco in which doctors “switched from written consent for [HIV] screening to oral request, a speeded-up process that boosted testing and turned up more” HIV-positive patients.
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Papers Examine Effects Of Expanded Eligibility In Public Health Insurance Program For Older Children, Medicare Spending; More

December 29, 2008

“Has Public Health Insurance for Older Children Reduced Disparities in Access to Care and Health Outcomes?” Journal of Health Economics: The paper examines the effects of expanding public health insurance programs for older children. The paper analyzes data from the National Health Interview Survey from 1986 to 2005 and finds that income became a less important predictor of the health statuses of children ages nine to 17 in recent years. In addition, the report finds that while eligibility for public health insurance programs improves current utilization of preventive care, it has little effect on a person’s current health status. In addition, the paper finds some evidence that Medicaid eligibility in early childhood has positive effects on future health, which suggests that early and adequate care puts children on a course for better health as they grow (Currie et al., Journal of Health Economics, December 2008).
Read the rest of this entry »