New Hope For HIV-1 Eradication From ‘Shock And Kill’ Research

June 6, 2009

Latent HIV genes can be ‘smoked out’ of human cells. The so-called ‘shock and kill’ technique, described in a preclinical study in BioMed Central’s open access journal Retrovirology, might represent a new milestone along the way to the discovery of a cure for HIV/AIDS.

Dr. Enrico Garaci, president of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (the Italian Institute of Health) and Dr. Andrea Savarino, a retrovirologist working at the institution, worked with a team of researchers to study the so-called “barrier of latency” which has been the main obstacle to HIV eradication from the body.
Read the rest of this entry »

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New Hope For HIV-1 Eradication From ‘Shock And Kill’ Research

June 6, 2009

Latent HIV genes can be ‘smoked out’ of human cells. The so-called ‘shock and kill’ technique, described in a preclinical study in BioMed Central’s open access journal Retrovirology, might represent a new milestone along the way to the discovery of a cure for HIV/AIDS.

Dr. Enrico Garaci, president of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (the Italian Institute of Health) and Dr. Andrea Savarino, a retrovirologist working at the institution, worked with a team of researchers to study the so-called “barrier of latency” which has been the main obstacle to HIV eradication from the body.
Read the rest of this entry »


Exploring The Genetic Variation Of HIV-1

December 24, 2008

A review article in the New England Journal of Medicine explores the genetic variation of HIV-1 and its implications for preventing and treating the disease. Francine McCutchan, Ph.D., a researcher with the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, co-authored the article.

HIV-1 is classified into several subtypes, or clades, which are denoted by letters. Subtype B is most prevalent in the Americas, whereas clades A, C and D are most prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa, the region that remains most severely affected by the pandemic.
Read the rest of this entry »


Exploring The Genetic Variation Of HIV-1

May 24, 2008

A review article in the New England Journal of Medicine explores the genetic variation of HIV-1 and its implications for preventing and treating the disease. Francine McCutchan, Ph.D., a researcher with the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, co-authored the article.

HIV-1 is classified into several subtypes, or clades, which are denoted by letters. Subtype B is most prevalent in the Americas, whereas clades A, C and D are most prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa, the region that remains most severely affected by the pandemic.
Read the rest of this entry »