Modifiable Hip Fracture Complications Contribute To Mortality, Institute For Aging Research Finds

May 26, 2009

Potentially modifiable post-fracture complications, including pneumonia and pressure ulcers, are associated with an increased risk of death among nursing home residents who have suffered a hip fracture, according to a new study conducted by scientists at the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife.

“Prevention strategies to reduce pressure ulcers and pneumonia may help reduce mortality in this frail population,” says lead author Sarah D. Berry, M.D., M.P.H., a research fellow at the Institute and a staff geriatrician at Hebrew Rehabilitation Center.
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Coalition For Quality & Patient Safety Of Chicagoland PSO Taps ECRI Institute PSO For Support

May 19, 2009

ECRI Institute Patient Safety Organization (PSO) is pleased to announce an agreement with the Coalition for Quality & Patient Safety (CQPS) of Chicagoland PSO to provide patient safety data collection, reporting, and analysis. The Chicagoland PSO focuses on local experience, patterns, trends, and patient safety initiatives specific to Chicago and the surrounding counties. CQPS will coordinate its PSO and other patient safety efforts with other Illinois-based hospital and primary care associations, the Illinois Department of Public Health, consumers and consumer advocates, other patient safety and quality improvement stakeholders, and existing patient safety collaboratives across the state.
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UPMC Cardiovascular Institute Recruiting For Severe Coronary Heart Disease Study

May 19, 2009

The UPMC Cardiovascular Institute currently is enrolling participants for a Phase 2 clinical trial to examine whether administering a naturally occurring protein improves blood supply to the cardiac muscle in patients with severe coronary artery disease.

The study, known as Angiogenesis for the Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease (ACORD), is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that compares the use of a protein at three dose levels with a placebo. The therapy is delivered to the heart muscle by threading a catheter through a small incision in the upper leg.
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Major Grant To Bolster Epigenomics Research Awarded To Broad Institute

January 6, 2009

Researchers at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have announced that they have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to map the epigenomes of a variety of medically important cell types, including human embryonic stem cells. The five-year, $15M grant, part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research, designates the institute as one of four Reference Epigenome Mapping Centers nationwide that will aim to transform the understanding of an exquisite control system – a code of so-called “epigenetic” cues that specify when and where in the body genes are made active. To systematically decipher and analyze these controls, researchers from across the Harvard and MIT communities will come together to study at least 100 distinct types of human cells using the latest methods in stem cell biology, genomics, technology, computation, and production-scale research.
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National Institute On Drug Abuse Announces Recipients Of New Avant-Garde Award For Innovative HIV/AIDS Research

January 1, 2009

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the first three recipients of its new Avant-Garde Award. This award is intended to stimulate high-impact research that may lead to groundbreaking opportunities for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS in drug abusers. Award recipients will receive $500,000 per year for five years to support their research.

NIDA’s HIV/AIDS Research Program supports an innovative and multidisciplinary HIV/AIDS research portfolio that addresses the role of drug use and its related behaviors in the evolving dynamics of HIV/AIDS epidemiology, natural history/pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention.
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National Institute On Drug Abuse Announces Recipients Of New Avant-Garde Award For Innovative HIV/AIDS Research

September 8, 2008

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the first three recipients of its new Avant-Garde Award. This award is intended to stimulate high-impact research that may lead to groundbreaking opportunities for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS in drug abusers. Award recipients will receive $500,000 per year for five years to support their research.

NIDA’s HIV/AIDS Research Program supports an innovative and multidisciplinary HIV/AIDS research portfolio that addresses the role of drug use and its related behaviors in the evolving dynamics of HIV/AIDS epidemiology, natural history/pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention.
Read the rest of this entry »