New Open-Source Software Permits Faster Desktop Computer Simulations Of Molecular Motion

February 9, 2009

Whether vibrating in place or taking part in protein folding to ensure cells function properly, molecules are never still. Simulating molecular motions provides researchers with information critical to designing vaccines and helps them decipher the bases of certain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, that result from molecular motion gone awry.

In the past, researchers needed either supercomputers or large computer clusters to run simulations. Or they had to be content to run only a tiny fraction of the process on their desktop computers. But a new open-source software package developed at Stanford University is making it possible to do complex simulations of molecular motion on desktop computers at much faster speeds than has been previously possible.
Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

American Physical Therapy Launches Campaign To Brand Physical Therapists As Experts In Human Motion

February 5, 2009

A new branding campaign that positions physical therapists as the experts in human motion will launch during the Combined Sections Meeting (CSM) of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Feb 9-12, 2009, in Las Vegas, NV., at the Brand Launch Reception, Tuesday, Feb. 10, from 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm in the Palm Foyer of the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino.

As motion experts, physical therapists will be positioned as specialists who can help improve mobility and quality of life without the expense and pain of surgery or side effects of prescription medication. The tagline will be: “Move Forward. Physical Therapy Brings Motion To Life.”
Read the rest of this entry »


Walk This Way? Masculine Motion Seems To Come At You, While Females Walk Away

January 1, 2009

You can tell a lot about people from the way they move alone: their gender, age, and even their mood, earlier studies have shown. Now, researchers reporting in the September 9th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have found that observers perceive masculine motion as coming toward them, while a characteristically feminine walk looks like it’s headed the other way.

Such studies are done by illuminating only the joints of model walkers and asking observers to identify various characteristics about the largely ambiguous figures.
Read the rest of this entry »


Walk This Way? Masculine Motion Seems To Come At You, While Females Walk Away

September 9, 2008

You can tell a lot about people from the way they move alone: their gender, age, and even their mood, earlier studies have shown. Now, researchers reporting in the September 9th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have found that observers perceive masculine motion as coming toward them, while a characteristically feminine walk looks like it’s headed the other way.

Such studies are done by illuminating only the joints of model walkers and asking observers to identify various characteristics about the largely ambiguous figures.
Read the rest of this entry »