Physician / Preventive Medicine Expert Explains How To Reverse Obesity And Diabetes Naturally

May 28, 2009

Irving A. Cohen, MD, MPH, will be at Book Expo America 2009, Booth 5065, May 29-31, to discuss his new book “Dr. Cohen’s Guide to the New Hippocratic Diet™: How to Really Lose Weight and Beat the Obesity Epidemic” It teaches dieters how to lose weight easily and naturally despite having failed before.

In his book, Dr. Cohen explains how three decades ago the Federal government tried to “fix” the problem of overweight adults by recommending low-fat diets for all Americans. They were wrong. As a result, four times as many Americans are overweight. Because most Americans believe that bad advice, they gain weight as they try to diet. The government blocks efforts to help those who are overweight or who may suffer from Type 2 Diabetes, unless they conform to that misguided government policy.
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JAMA Editorial, Commentary Discuss Effect Of Medical Spending On Health Outcomes, Preventive Health Efforts

December 25, 2008

“Spending on Medical Care: More Is Better?” Journal of the American Medical Association: The JAMA editorial by Gerard Anderson and Kalipso Chalkidou of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health discusses studies that have examined whether increased spending on health care leads to better health outcomes. According to Anderson and Chalkidou, studies generally have not found a link between health spending levels and health outcomes, and factors such as education among women, average per capita income and degree of income inequality may better explain cross-national variation in overall health status than the level of health spending (Anderson/Chalkidou, JAMA, 5/28).
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JAMA Editorial, Commentary Discuss Effect Of Medical Spending On Health Outcomes, Preventive Health Efforts

December 24, 2008

“Spending on Medical Care: More Is Better?” Journal of the American Medical Association: The JAMA editorial by Gerard Anderson and Kalipso Chalkidou of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health discusses studies that have examined whether increased spending on health care leads to better health outcomes. According to Anderson and Chalkidou, studies generally have not found a link between health spending levels and health outcomes, and factors such as education among women, average per capita income and degree of income inequality may better explain cross-national variation in overall health status than the level of health spending (Anderson/Chalkidou, JAMA, 5/28).
Read the rest of this entry »


JAMA Editorial, Commentary Discuss Effect Of Medical Spending On Health Outcomes, Preventive Health Efforts

May 29, 2008

“Spending on Medical Care: More Is Better?” Journal of the American Medical Association: The JAMA editorial by Gerard Anderson and Kalipso Chalkidou of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health discusses studies that have examined whether increased spending on health care leads to better health outcomes. According to Anderson and Chalkidou, studies generally have not found a link between health spending levels and health outcomes, and factors such as education among women, average per capita income and degree of income inequality may better explain cross-national variation in overall health status than the level of health spending (Anderson/Chalkidou, JAMA, 5/28).
Read the rest of this entry »


JAMA Editorial, Commentary Discuss Effect Of Medical Spending On Health Outcomes, Preventive Health Efforts

May 29, 2008

“Spending on Medical Care: More Is Better?” Journal of the American Medical Association: The JAMA editorial by Gerard Anderson and Kalipso Chalkidou of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health discusses studies that have examined whether increased spending on health care leads to better health outcomes. According to Anderson and Chalkidou, studies generally have not found a link between health spending levels and health outcomes, and factors such as education among women, average per capita income and degree of income inequality may better explain cross-national variation in overall health status than the level of health spending (Anderson/Chalkidou, JAMA, 5/28).
Read the rest of this entry »