Sen. Grassley Considers Proposing Legislation That Would Require Not-for-Profit Hospitals To Spend A Minimum Amount On Charity Care, More

January 16, 2009

Senate Finance Committee ranking member Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) might propose legislation in the first quarter of 2009 that would attempt to hold not-for-profit hospitals accountable for the billions of dollars in tax exemptions they receive annually, according to members of Grassley’s staff, the Wall Street Journal reports. Grassley is working on the legislation with other Senate members, including Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.). The aides noted that Grassley first plans to urge the Treasury Department to reinstate charity care requirements that the Internal Revenue Service eliminated in 1969 before proposing new legislation.
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Los Angeles Times Examines Calif. Ballot Measure To Require Parental Notification For Minors Seeking Abortions

January 5, 2009

The Los Angeles Times on Wednesday examined Proposition 4, a California ballot measure that would require physicians to notify a parent or adult family member 48 hours before providing abortion services to a minor. The measure would amend the state constitution by barring abortions to minors until at least 48 hours after notification of the minor’s parents or an adult family member.

The proposition is similar to two California ballot propositions in 2005 and 2006 that failed to pass. The 2005 measure received about 47% of voter support, and about 46% of state voters favored the 2006 initiative. Revisions to Proposition 4 from the past proposition include allowing an adult family member — including a grandparent or sibling — to be notified instead of a parent when the physician reports suspected or known child abuse to law enforcement. Judges also can waive the notification requirement in cases where they find evidence that the minor’s maturity is substantial, or if an abortion is in the minor’s best interest, such as a medical emergency. Parents also could waive the notification and waiting period through a written note.
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Study Finds Public Health Programs Require Less Per-Person Spending Than Private Plans

December 30, 2008

“Public and Private Insurance: Stacking Up the Costs,” Health Affairs: The Web exclusive study — by Leighton Ku, a professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, and Matthew Broaddus, a research analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities — finds that providing health coverage to low-income people through public programs such as Medicaid and SCHIP, rather than through private health plans, results in lower per-person medical spending and out-of-pocket expenses. For example, the study finds that total spending to provide full-year Medicaid coverage for an average low-income uninsured adult would have been $3,084 in 2005, compared with $3,899 for private coverage. Annual out-of-pocket expenses for a Medicaid beneficiary would have totaled $109, compared with $771 for those enrolled in private plans, according to the study (Ku/Broaddus, Health Affairs release, 6/24).
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Study Finds Public Health Programs Require Less Per-Person Spending Than Private Plans

December 26, 2008

“Public and Private Insurance: Stacking Up the Costs,” Health Affairs: The Web exclusive study — by Leighton Ku, a professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, and Matthew Broaddus, a research analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities — finds that providing health coverage to low-income people through public programs such as Medicaid and SCHIP, rather than through private health plans, results in lower per-person medical spending and out-of-pocket expenses. For example, the study finds that total spending to provide full-year Medicaid coverage for an average low-income uninsured adult would have been $3,084 in 2005, compared with $3,899 for private coverage. Annual out-of-pocket expenses for a Medicaid beneficiary would have totaled $109, compared with $771 for those enrolled in private plans, according to the study (Ku/Broaddus, Health Affairs release, 6/24).
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Study Finds Public Health Programs Require Less Per-Person Spending Than Private Plans

June 26, 2008

“Public and Private Insurance: Stacking Up the Costs,” Health Affairs: The Web exclusive study — by Leighton Ku, a professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, and Matthew Broaddus, a research analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities — finds that providing health coverage to low-income people through public programs such as Medicaid and SCHIP, rather than through private health plans, results in lower per-person medical spending and out-of-pocket expenses. For example, the study finds that total spending to provide full-year Medicaid coverage for an average low-income uninsured adult would have been $3,084 in 2005, compared with $3,899 for private coverage. Annual out-of-pocket expenses for a Medicaid beneficiary would have totaled $109, compared with $771 for those enrolled in private plans, according to the study (Ku/Broaddus, Health Affairs release, 6/24).
Read the rest of this entry »


Study Finds Public Health Programs Require Less Per-Person Spending Than Private Plans

June 26, 2008

“Public and Private Insurance: Stacking Up the Costs,” Health Affairs: The Web exclusive study — by Leighton Ku, a professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, and Matthew Broaddus, a research analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities — finds that providing health coverage to low-income people through public programs such as Medicaid and SCHIP, rather than through private health plans, results in lower per-person medical spending and out-of-pocket expenses. For example, the study finds that total spending to provide full-year Medicaid coverage for an average low-income uninsured adult would have been $3,084 in 2005, compared with $3,899 for private coverage. Annual out-of-pocket expenses for a Medicaid beneficiary would have totaled $109, compared with $771 for those enrolled in private plans, according to the study (Ku/Broaddus, Health Affairs release, 6/24).
Read the rest of this entry »