Researchers Develop An Intelligent Chip Which Regulates Diabetes

June 7, 2009

Scientists of the Electronic Technology group of the University of Seville (US), led by Professor José Manuel Quero, have completed the first phase of Mireia, a research project financed by the Plan Nacional del Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (National Plan of the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry), whose aim is to develop an intelligent chip to regulate diabetes in any kind of patients suffering this disease.

With this research, the idea is to extract the interstitial liquid with micro needles that are 200 microns long (the double than a hair’s thickness). This painless process is carried out with sensors and micro fluidics and patients are informed every now and again in their mobiles of their level of glucose.
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Researchers Develop An Intelligent Chip Which Regulates Diabetes

June 7, 2009

Scientists of the Electronic Technology group of the University of Seville (US), led by Professor José Manuel Quero, have completed the first phase of Mireia, a research project financed by the Plan Nacional del Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (National Plan of the Spanish Science and Innovation Ministry), whose aim is to develop an intelligent chip to regulate diabetes in any kind of patients suffering this disease.

With this research, the idea is to extract the interstitial liquid with micro needles that are 200 microns long (the double than a hair’s thickness). This painless process is carried out with sensors and micro fluidics and patients are informed every now and again in their mobiles of their level of glucose.
Read the rest of this entry »


Researchers Clone Key Sperm-binding Proteins

March 19, 2009

New treatments for infertility could be closer to reality, thanks to a discovery from scientists at the Université de Montréal and Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre. According to a study published in the journal Molecular Human Reproduction, the researchers have become the first to clone, produce and purify a protein important for sperm maturation, termed Binder of Sperm (BSP), which may have implications for both fertility treatments and new methods of male contraception.
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Structure Of Key Ebola Protein Discovered By Iowa State University Researchers

January 20, 2009

Research led by Iowa State University scientists has them a step closer to finding a way to counter the Ebola virus.

A team led by Gaya Amarasinghe, an assistant professor in biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, has recently solved the structure from a key part of the Ebola protein known as VP35.

VP35 interferes with the natural resistance of host cells against viral infections.

“Usually when viruses infect cells, the host immune system can fight to eventually clear the virus. But with Ebola infections, the ability of the host to mount a defense against the invading virus is lost,” said Amarasinghe.
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Researchers Report First Successful Transplant Of Complete Ovary To Restore Fertility

January 15, 2009

Physicians for the first time have successfully transplanted an intact ovary into a previously infertile patient, resulting in a live birth last month, doctors from the Infertility Center of St. Louisreported on Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, Reuters reports. The researchers said the new technique potentially could be used to preserve fertility for cancer patients who may lose ovarian function or for women who wish to have children later in life, when they are less fertile. Sherman Silber of the infertility center and colleagues transplanted a woman’s entire ovary into her 38-year-old identical twin sister, who had experienced premature menopause at age 15. The ovary restored full fertility in the sister, they reported.
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Researchers At Global HIV/AIDS Vaccine Conference Express Concerns About Funding Levels

January 8, 2009

Experts at the AIDS Vaccine 2008 conference in Cape Town, South Africa, on Tuesday expressed concerns that the current global economic situation could damage funding for AIDS research and vaccine development, the AP/Los Angeles Times reports. The economic situation has “added to the gloom among experts deeply frustrated by … setbacks” in HIV/AIDS vaccine research, according to the AP/Times. There also are concerns that some groups that are large contributors to health and international development initiatives could reduce funding in light of the economic situation, the AP/Times reports.
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New Self-Training Gene Prediction Program For Fungi Developed By Researchers At Georgia Tech

January 5, 2009

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a computer program that trains itself to predict genes in the DNA sequences of fungi.

Fungi – which range from yeast to mushrooms – are important for industry and human health, so understanding the recently sequenced fungal genomes can help in developing and producing critical pharmaceuticals. Gene prediction can also help to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention and vaccination against pathogenic fungi.
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