Rosiglitazone For Type 2 Diabetes Does Not Increase Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death But Increases Heart Failure And Fractures In Women

June 9, 2009

Using rosiglitazone (Avandia) in combination with standard diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. However, the study confirms that using rosiglitazone more than doubles the risks of heart failure, and also increases the risk of fractures, mainly in women. The findings of the RECORD study are published in an Article Online First and in an upcoming edition of Read the rest of this entry »

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Combination Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes With Rosiglitazone (RECORD Study) Shows No Increase Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death

June 6, 2009

The results of the RECORD study are reported in an article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet. The findings are presented at the same time at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in New Orleans, USA. They indicate that the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) together with regular diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to reduce blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not raise the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. On the other hand, the research establishes that using rosiglitazone multiplies by more than two the risk of heart failure, and increases the risk of fracture, mostly in women.
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Combination Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes With Rosiglitazone (RECORD Study) Shows No Increase Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death

June 6, 2009

The results of the RECORD study are reported in an article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet. The findings are presented at the same time at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in New Orleans, USA. They indicate that the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) together with regular diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to reduce blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not raise the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. On the other hand, the research establishes that using rosiglitazone multiplies by more than two the risk of heart failure, and increases the risk of fracture, mostly in women.
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Women With Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy Have A Substantial And Persistently Elevated Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Post-Birth

May 23, 2009

Women who develop gestational diabetes (GD) during pregnancy have a seven-and-a-half times increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes post-birth, which lasts throughout their lifetime. However, there is no agreed policy on the long-term follow up of these women and many do not return for the currently recommended 6-week post-birth diabetes check. An Article in this week’s diabetes special issue of The Lancet says that the strength of the association suggests that both disorders have an overlapping cause-and this should act as an incentive for women to attend the recommended post-birth check. This attendance could be an opportunity to provide advice on diet and exercise, and treatments to delay or prevent onset of diabetes-as well as alerting these women to symptoms of future diabetes, and to alert general practitioners responsible for their long-term care.
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Investigation Of Urodynamic Characteristics And Bladder Sensory Function In The Early Stages Of Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction In Type 2 Diabetes Women

January 19, 2009

UroToday.com – For decades, scientists believed that the diabetic cystopathy is a result of vesical sensory dysfunction. But, how could the vesical sensory dysfunction affect the emptying function in diabetic patients? The overdistention due to sensory loss of the bladder filling in diabetes is the most popular explanation. Is it true? There is little evidence in human research to suggest it is. The other question is the role of C fiber neuropathy in the pathophysiology of the diabetic bladder dysfunction. In humans, the physiological function of vesical C fiber is still unclear. Traditionally, urologists only can evaluate the vesical C fiber neuropathy by ice water test and thus obtain a rough result. Most neurourologists could support the notion that activation of C fiber is contributed to detrusor overactivity in some pathophysiological conditions. Could the sensory loss of vesical C fiber in diabetes impair the emptying function or not? It is an interesting question.
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Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With Low-Carb Diets

January 18, 2009

In a six-month comparison of low-carb diets, one that encourages eating carbohydrates with the lowest-possible rating on the glycemic index leads to greater improvement in blood sugar control, according to Duke University Medical Center researchers.

Patients who followed the no-glycemic diet experienced more frequent reductions, and in some cases elimination, of their need for medication to control type 2 diabetes, according to lead author Eric Westman, MD, director of Duke’s Lifestyle Medicine Program. The findings are published online in Read the rest of this entry »


Southampton Researchers Unlock Secrets Of Most Common Type Of Leukaemia

December 28, 2008

Researchers at the University of Southampton (England) are testing patients along the South Coast in order to gain further understanding of the causes of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the commonest form of leukaemia in adults. Blood cancer charity Leukaemia Research has awarded Dr Jonathon Strefford £435,000 to carry out the research at Southampton General Hospital, which will involve testing patients for any abnormalities in their genetic code which may be causing their disease.
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