Investments In Women, Girls ‘Guaranteed To Show Enormous Returns,’ Sen. Kerry Writes In Opinion Piece

March 20, 2009

President Obama’s announcement last week of a new White House Council on Women and Girls “was just the latest sign of an encouraging trend” of increased attention to women’s issues, Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) — chair of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee and a former Democratic presidential nominee — writes in a Washington Times opinion piece. Kerry adds that the State Department’s plan to name an ambassador-at-large for women’s issues and his creation of a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on global women’s issues means that “women across the world have more champions in American government than ever before.” Kerry writes that the “wave of women’s advocates arrive in Washington not a moment too soon,” adding that “[i]t’s up to all of us to ensure that this economic crisis does not become a global women’s crisis, too.” He continues, “[W]e must now make sure that women workers aren’t pushed aside as businesses downsize and that daughters aren’t taken out of school as families search for extra income,” noting that in many developing countries, women and girls are “asked to bear the brunt of the hardship.” Oftentimes women in these countries have to “contend not only with an economic crisis, but also with discrimination,” he says. They become “pushed outside the formal economy, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation” and “susceptible to predatory human traffickers — a human rights abuse that can and must be prevented,” Kerry says.
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Breast Cancer Risk Rapidly Declined After Women Stopped Taking Postmenopausal Combined Hormone Therapy

February 6, 2009

Women who stopped taking the postmenopausal hormone combination of estrogen plus progestin experienced a marked decline in breast cancer risk which was unrelated to mammography utilization change, according to a study from the Women’s Health Initiative led by a Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) investigator.

The study, based on data from the Women’s Health Initiative, will be published Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine. Read the rest of this entry »


Resting Heart Rate Can Predict Heart Attacks In Women

February 6, 2009

A simple measurement of resting pulse predicts coronary events in women independently of physical activity and common risk factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, finds a study published on bmj.com today.

Previous studies have shown that resting heart rate predicts coronary events in men. But, for women, the relationship between heart rate and coronary events or stroke remains uncertain.

So researchers in the USA assessed resting heart rate in 129,135 postmenopausal women with no history of heart problems. Risk factors that might be expected to affect heart rate, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking and alcohol intake were taken into account at the start of the study. The women were monitored for an average of 7.8 years, during which time all hospital stays and coronary events were recorded.
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Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy For Women With BRCA Mutations: Value Confirmed By Meta-Analysis

January 20, 2009

Prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy – removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes – reduces the relative risk of breast cancer by approximately 50 percent and the risk of ovarian and fallopian tube cancer by approximately 80 percent in women who carry a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, researchers report in the January 13 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Previous studies have shown substantial reduction in the risks of breast and ovarian or fallopian tube cancers in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers following salpingo-oophorectomy. However, the magnitude of the benefit has been unclear.
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Investigation Of Urodynamic Characteristics And Bladder Sensory Function In The Early Stages Of Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction In Type 2 Diabetes Women

January 19, 2009

UroToday.com – For decades, scientists believed that the diabetic cystopathy is a result of vesical sensory dysfunction. But, how could the vesical sensory dysfunction affect the emptying function in diabetic patients? The overdistention due to sensory loss of the bladder filling in diabetes is the most popular explanation. Is it true? There is little evidence in human research to suggest it is. The other question is the role of C fiber neuropathy in the pathophysiology of the diabetic bladder dysfunction. In humans, the physiological function of vesical C fiber is still unclear. Traditionally, urologists only can evaluate the vesical C fiber neuropathy by ice water test and thus obtain a rough result. Most neurourologists could support the notion that activation of C fiber is contributed to detrusor overactivity in some pathophysiological conditions. Could the sensory loss of vesical C fiber in diabetes impair the emptying function or not? It is an interesting question.
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Folic Acid Supplements Help To Prevent Certain Birth Defects For Which Hispanic Women Have Increased Risk

January 19, 2009

Twenty-one percent of Hispanic women are consuming enough folic acid to prevent certain birth defects before becoming pregnant, compared with more than 40% of white women, the North Denver News reports. Consuming adequate amounts of the dietary supplement before becoming pregnant can help prevent neural tube birth defects — serious defects of the spine and brain. According to the News, roughly 3,000 infants are born with neural tube birth defects annually. The effects of the conditions occur within the first few weeks of pregnancy, often before a woman is aware that she is pregnant.
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Folic Acid Supplements Help To Prevent Certain Birth Defects For Which Hispanic Women Have Increased Risk

January 10, 2009

Twenty-one percent of Hispanic women are consuming enough folic acid to prevent certain birth defects before becoming pregnant, compared with more than 40% of white women, the North Denver News reports. Consuming adequate amounts of the dietary supplement before becoming pregnant can help prevent neural tube birth defects — serious defects of the spine and brain. According to the News, roughly 3,000 infants are born with neural tube birth defects annually. The effects of the conditions occur within the first few weeks of pregnancy, often before a woman is aware that she is pregnant.
Read the rest of this entry »