Size And Fitness Levels Of NHL Players Have Improved, University Of Alberta Study Shows

September 20, 2008

Imagine taking a picture of your favourite sports team every year for a generation. Looking back over a quarter of century, the changes you’d see are significant.

Researchers in the University of Alberta Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation looked at an NHL team over a 26-year cycle and discovered players have become bigger and fitter.

The research team studied 703 players from a Canadian-based NHL team from 1979 to 2005. The physiological profile derived from their research shows that over the 26 seasons, defencemen became taller and heavier as body mass increased; forwards got younger and had higher peak aerobic power outputs for cardio-respiratory endurance, while goalies were shorter and more flexible and had lower peak aerobic power outputs. All players combined (defence, forwards and goaltenders) increased body mass, height and anaerobic power over the 26 years.
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Symposium Highlights Yale Study Indicating Role Of AHCC(R) For Immune System Enhancement And As A Promising Cancer Preventative

September 20, 2008

The 16th International AHCC(R) (Active Hexose Correlated Compound) Symposium was held in Sapporo, Japan on July 26th and 27th. The Symposium hosted by the AHCC Research Association was attended by over 300 medical doctors and researchers from around the world that presented and discussed research studies completed with AHCC. Individuals attending this year’s event included representatives from Harvard Medical School, Yale University School of Medicine and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.
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New Data Presented At WCTRIMS Supports The Importance Of Early And Sustained Treatment With Betaseron(R)

September 20, 2008

Data presented at the World Congress on Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (WCTRIMS) demonstrated that early initiation of Betaseron(R) (interferon beta-1b) treatment had a greater impact on long-term outcomes, when compared to delayed treatment. (i)

The study, sponsored by Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, used data from the 16-Year Long-Term Follow-up Study of Betaseron to investigate the relationship between timing of drug initiation and length of exposure to treatment, and long-term outcomes. It demonstrated that initiating Betaseron treatment early in the disease reduced the risk of negative long-term outcomes, including conversion to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), reaching a confirmed EDSS of 6.0 or the use of a wheelchair. The study also found that the longer patients stayed on treatment, the better their long-term outcomes were. (i)
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Does Probiotic Intervention Induce The Serum Global Lipid Profile Change?

September 20, 2008

The new global metabolic profiling techniques, like lipidomics as a branch of metabolomics, have made it possible to measure large numbers of different metabolites, and are currently being applied to increase our understanding of the health and disease continuum.

A Finland research group investigated the effect of a three weeks intervention of a probiotic LGG intervention on serum global lipidomics profiles in healthy adults. This was published on 28 May 2008, in the Read the rest of this entry »


Pharmacy calling to tell me to refill

September 19, 2008

Question:

Question: My pharmacy has started a new “program” to call customers to tell them when (the pharmacy thinks) it is time to refill medications. Some of the medications they have called me about are PRN (take as needed) like a rescue inhaler for mild asthma. There isn`t a certain amount of that which I`m “supposed to” take regularly, so how would they know whether I need a refill? This seems like a “program” designed to sell more prescription drugs than a “useful reminder service” which is what they are calling it. A competing pharmacy just opened 2 blocks away and I think they are just doing this to try to make sure they keep their old customers.

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Drugs For Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis Assessed

September 19, 2008

The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) programme has funded a £1.6 million clinical trial to compare two powerful drugs for people with steroid resistant acute severe ulcerative colitis (UC). UC affects approximately 150,000 people in the UK and is a major burden on patients and NHS resources, as it often leads to severe morbidity, grossly impaired quality of life, frequent and long inpatients stays and emergency colectomy.
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Discovery Of ‘Lipokine’ Signaling Could Eventually Lead To New Treatments For Obesity-Related Conditions

September 19, 2008

Scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have identified in mice a newly discovered class of hormones — lipokines, according to a report in the September 19, 2008, issue of Cell. Furthermore, they have implicated a lipokine as a molecule in mice that helps stop or even reverse obesity-related conditions such as insulin resistance and “fatty liver.”

Lipokines are hormones made from lipids, or fats. All other known hormones — chemical signals secreted into the blood that regulate distant cells and organs — are steroid- or protein-based.
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