Rosiglitazone For Type 2 Diabetes Does Not Increase Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death But Increases Heart Failure And Fractures In Women

June 9, 2009

Using rosiglitazone (Avandia) in combination with standard diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. However, the study confirms that using rosiglitazone more than doubles the risks of heart failure, and also increases the risk of fractures, mainly in women. The findings of the RECORD study are published in an Article Online First and in an upcoming edition of Read the rest of this entry »


Combination Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes With Rosiglitazone (RECORD Study) Shows No Increase Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death

June 6, 2009

The results of the RECORD study are reported in an article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet. The findings are presented at the same time at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in New Orleans, USA. They indicate that the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) together with regular diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to reduce blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not raise the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. On the other hand, the research establishes that using rosiglitazone multiplies by more than two the risk of heart failure, and increases the risk of fracture, mostly in women.
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Combination Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes With Rosiglitazone (RECORD Study) Shows No Increase Of Cardiovascular Disease Or Death

June 6, 2009

The results of the RECORD study are reported in an article published Online First and in a future edition of The Lancet. The findings are presented at the same time at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in New Orleans, USA. They indicate that the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) together with regular diabetes treatments (metformin or a sulfonylurea) to reduce blood glucose in type 2 diabetics does not raise the risk of cardiovascular disease or death. On the other hand, the research establishes that using rosiglitazone multiplies by more than two the risk of heart failure, and increases the risk of fracture, mostly in women.
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Role For Innate, Not Adaptive, Immunity Revealed By Autoinflammatory Disease Model

June 6, 2009

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have developed the first mouse model for auto-inflammatory diseases, disorders that involve the over-activation of the body’s innate, primitive immune system. Their study, published early on-line in Cell Immunity on June 4, suggests that the innate – not adaptive – immune system drives auto-inflammatory diseases. The findings could open new therapeutic directions for research into disorders such as gout or inflammatory bowel disease.
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Cytori Completes Enrollment In First Adipose Stem & Regenerative Cell Therapy Trial For Chronic Heart Disease

May 30, 2009

Cytori (NASDAQ:CYTX) completed enrollment in the first study to investigate adipose derived stem and regenerative cells in chronic heart disease. The trial, which has been named the PRECISE study, was carried out at leading cardiology centers in Europe. It specifically enrolled patients suffering from an advanced form of chronic heart disease, known as chronic myocardial ischemia, for which there is no generally accepted treatment.

The trial enrolled 27 patients and was designed as a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, dose escalation study. It is unique in that the patients’ own cells were extracted from adipose tissue and processed for delivery at the point of care using Cytori’s Celution System. The cells were then injected back into the patients using the NOGA XP System (Biologics Delivery Systems, Cordis Corp., a Johnson and Johnson company), which identifies and guides cells to damaged regions of the heart.
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UPMC Cardiovascular Institute Recruiting For Severe Coronary Heart Disease Study

May 19, 2009

The UPMC Cardiovascular Institute currently is enrolling participants for a Phase 2 clinical trial to examine whether administering a naturally occurring protein improves blood supply to the cardiac muscle in patients with severe coronary artery disease.

The study, known as Angiogenesis for the Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease (ACORD), is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that compares the use of a protein at three dose levels with a placebo. The therapy is delivered to the heart muscle by threading a catheter through a small incision in the upper leg.
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Hyperferritinemia Is Another Surrogate Marker Of Advanced Liver Disease

May 15, 2009

High serum ferritin, being a hallmark of hereditary hemochromatosis , is frequently found in chronic hepatitis C, alcoholic or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients . A study in Italy has investigated the link between ferritin and steatosis in a non-obese cohort of non-alcoholic patients. In southern European populations, high ferritin levels, after exclusion of diagnosis of HH, represent a risk factor for steatosis and clinical relevance, being associated with low platelet count.
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