Gene Network Sciences Announces Broad Cancer Collaboration With UCSF And Initial Results

June 1, 2009

Gene Network Sciences, Inc. (GNS) announced that it has entered into a research collaboration with the University of California San Francisco Cancer Center (UCSF) aimed at accelerating cancer research and drug development across several therapeutic areas. This collaboration will combine the clinical and research oncology expertise of UCSF with the computational expertise and supercomputer-driven REFS(TM) platform of GNS. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.
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Gene Network Sciences Announces Broad Cancer Collaboration With UCSF And Initial Results

June 1, 2009

Gene Network Sciences, Inc. (GNS) announced that it has entered into a research collaboration with the University of California San Francisco Cancer Center (UCSF) aimed at accelerating cancer research and drug development across several therapeutic areas. This collaboration will combine the clinical and research oncology expertise of UCSF with the computational expertise and supercomputer-driven REFS(TM) platform of GNS. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.
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Gene Signature Predicts Good Outcome In Breast Cancer

May 15, 2009

Researchers have identified a genetic signature that can predict an improved clinical outcome in patients with breast cancer, and which could help in the development of new targeted therapies.

By analysing the expression of different genes induced by a specific mutation in a molecule called PIK3CA, a critical part of the pathway commonly deregulated in breast cancer, they found that these genes were correlated with an improved clinical outcome in over 1500 women with the disease.
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Gene Variation Found To Help Predict Surgical Outcomes Of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Patients

March 26, 2009

A study with far-reaching implications for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery has identified human genetic variants that could help doctors predict the potential for certain patients to suffer poor heart function.

Amanda A. Fox, M.D., and her co-investigators from the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Division of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology at the Texas Heart Institute, identified variants in two sets of genes that, when added into a clinical model for predicting heart function, offer significant improvement in the ability to anticipate heart problems after surgery.
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Too Much Of A Good Thing: Extra Copies Of A Gene Carry Extra Risk

February 7, 2009

Is more of a good thing better? A gene known as LIS1 is crucial for ensuring the proper placement of neurons in the developing brain. When an LIS1 gene is missing, brains fail to develop the characteristic folds; babies with lissencephaly or ‘smooth brain’ are born severely mentally retarded. But new research by Prof. Orly Reiner of the Institute’s Molecular Genetics Department, which recently appeared in Nature Genetics, shows that having extra LIS1 genes can cause problems as well.
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Too Much Of A Good Thing: Extra Copies Of A Gene Carry Extra Risk

February 6, 2009

Is more of a good thing better? A gene known as LIS1 is crucial for ensuring the proper placement of neurons in the developing brain. When an LIS1 gene is missing, brains fail to develop the characteristic folds; babies with lissencephaly or ‘smooth brain’ are born severely mentally retarded. But new research by Prof. Orly Reiner of the Institute’s Molecular Genetics Department, which recently appeared in Nature Genetics, shows that having extra LIS1 genes can cause problems as well.
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Fighting Gum Disease With Gene Therapy

January 15, 2009

Scientists at the University of Michigan have shown that gene therapy can be used to successfully stop the development of periodontal disease, the leading cause of tooth loss in adults.

The findings will be published online Dec 11 in advance of print publication in Gene Therapy.

Using gene transfer to treat life threatening conditions is not new, but the U-M group is the first known to use the gene delivery approach to show potential in treating chronic conditions such as periodontal disease, said William Giannobile, professor at the U-M School of Dentistry and principal investigator on the study.
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