Marijuana Rivals Mainstream Drugs For HIV/AIDS Symptoms

June 1, 2009

Those in the United States living with HIV/AIDS are more likely to use marijuana than those in Kenya, South Africa or Puerto Rica to alleviate their symptoms, according to a new study published in Clinical Nursing Research, published by SAGE. Those who did use marijuana rate it as effective as prescribed or over the counter (OTC) medicines for the majority of common symptoms, once again raising the issue that therapeutic marijuana use merits further study and consideration among policy makers.
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Cambodia Health Officials Expand HIV/AIDS Prevention Education To Primary Schools

May 22, 2009

The Cambodian Ministry of Health has begun training primary education teachers in 12 provinces on HIV/AIDS prevention education, the Phnom Penh Post reports. Health officials said that although children in primary school are not seen as a high-risk population, they need to be educated on the disease. Mean Chhi Vun — director of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Dermatology and STDs — said the students “are a group of people we have to pay attention to because they … will be the backbone of the nation.”
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Cambodia Health Officials Expand HIV/AIDS Prevention Education To Primary Schools

May 22, 2009

The Cambodian Ministry of Health has begun training primary education teachers in 12 provinces on HIV/AIDS prevention education, the Phnom Penh Post reports. Health officials said that although children in primary school are not seen as a high-risk population, they need to be educated on the disease. Mean Chhi Vun — director of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Dermatology and STDs — said the students “are a group of people we have to pay attention to because they … will be the backbone of the nation.”
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Shortage Of HIV/AIDS, TB, Malaria Drugs In Ugandan District Could Lead To Treatment Interruption, Drug Resistance

April 22, 2009

A shortage of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria medications in Uganda’s northern Gulu district could cause patients to interrupt treatment and lead to drug resistance, Paul Onek, Gulu director of health services, said recently, IRIN/PlusNews reports. According to IRIN/PlusNews, inadequate management of the country’s drug supply regularly causes shortages.

More than 2,000 TB patients in the district have begun a six-month treatment regimen and about 1,300 HIV-positive people have received a monthly supply of antiretrovirals from Gulu’s largest hospital. However, Onek noted that the district has not received TB drugs since January. Angelo Ojera, HIV focal point in the district, said that some TB patients are taking expired medications and that some HIV-positive people who have malaria have had to purchase drugs from private clinics.
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UNITAID, Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative Reach Agreement With Generic HIV/AIDS Drug Manufacturers To Lower Prices

April 21, 2009

UNITAID and the Clinton Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative on Friday announced a bulk purchasing agreement with a group of generic drug manufacturers that will reduce the price of some antiretroviral drugs in developing countries, Reuters reports. The discounted prices have been reached for 41 adult and pediatric medications at an average discount of 16% compared with 2008, according to Reuters (Hirschler, Reuters, 4/16).

The agreement will reduce the cost of a generic, second-line regimen that contains tenofovir, lamivudine and lopinavir/ritonavir by 18% and 39% compared with average prices in low- and middle-income countries, respectively (UNITAID/Clinton Foundation release, 4/17). Under the agreement, the new cost will be $590 annually, compared with more than $700 one year ago (Reuters, 4/16). The agreement also includes three generic suppliers, which will provide heat-stable lopinavir/ritonavir for $470 per patient annually. In addition, the agreement includes a lower price — $210 per patient annually — for a first-line, once-daily treatment that includes tenofovir, lamivudine and efavirenz. The new cost is 37% lower than the current average market price in low-income countries (UNITAID/Clinton Foundation release, 4/17).
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Latin American HIV/AIDS Advocacy Group Launches Magazine For Women

March 27, 2009

The Inter Press Service on Monday examined a new magazine published by the Latin American branch of the International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS. The magazine — called “No Estas Sola,” or “You Are Not Alone” — focuses on providing HIV-positive women in Latin America with information about the virus, stigma, their rights and empowerment. Maria Mansilla, the editor in charge of the publication, said, “What we are trying to do through the magazine is to break with the weepy approach, where there is only room for complaints or for the scientific-medical perspective.” The magazine is a quarterly publication that is distributed in the 20 Latin American countries where ICW Latina has national chapters. Daniel Barberis, media officer for ICW Latina, said the magazine could be published more frequently in the future.
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The Spread Of HIV/AIDS Denials And Misinformation Examined In New Book

March 19, 2009

Since the discovery of HIV and the ensuing AIDS epidemic, a frightening group of people has spread destructive misinformation – and outright denials – about the virus. Seth Kalichman, editor of the journal AIDS and Behavior, debunks these dangerous myths in the new book Denying AIDS, published by Springer. Denying AIDS captures the contradictions inherent in AIDS denialism and exposes the scientific and sociopolitical forces involved in AIDS denial.
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