Policies On Organ Donation After Cardiac Death Vary Considerably Among Children’s Hospitals

May 16, 2009

Although a large number of children’s hospitals have developed or are developing policies regarding organ donation after cardiac death, there is considerable variation among policies, including the criteria for declaring death, according to a study in the May 13 issue of JAMA.

Donation after cardiac death (DCD) potentially permits patients who do not meet the neurological criteria for death to donate solid organs. “Controlled DCD occurs following planned withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, and uncontrolled DCD occurs after unanticipated cardiac arrest. Potential controlled DCD donors include patients with irreversible catastrophic brain injury or end-stage neuromuscular diseases,” the authors write. Although the Joint Commission requires all hospitals to address DCD, little is known about actual hospital policies.
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Woman Had Heart Surgery Minutes After Having Twins And Survives

April 20, 2009

Nina Whear, 38, of Lamas, Norfolk, England, has survived heart surgery just minutes after giving birth to twins. Her husband was told to say goodbye when doctors had given her a 7% chance of survival. A hospital chaplain was brought in to comfort her during her last moments.

When Mrs. Whear was found to have a tear in the wall of the aorta – an aortic dissection – at the ninth month of her pregnancy, doctors carried out an emergency c-section (cesarean). An aortic dissection affects the blood flow and can lead to death.
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FDA Committee Finds Favorable Profile For Rivaroxaban For DVT And Pulmonary Embolism After Hip/Knee Surgery

March 22, 2009

Ortho-McNeil announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee has determined that rivaroxaban, a novel, investigational, oral anticoagulant, has a favorable risk-benefit profile for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients undergoing hip replacement or knee replacement surgery.

The advisory committee agreed by a 15-2 vote that the available clinical data demonstrate a favorable risk-benefit profile.
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Health Benefits Of Green Tea May Decrease After Long Storage

March 19, 2009

Green tea leaves produce antioxidative organic compounds, called catechins, that are reported to have beneficial health effects such as fighting bacteria, viruses and cancer. But consumers need to be aware of possible adverse consequences of long-term storage of commercial tea brands, say researchers Mendel Friedman and Carol E. Levin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Western Regional Research Center in Albany, California, and S.U. Lee and N. Kozukue of Uiduk University in Korea, in an article in the Read the rest of this entry »


Health Benefits Of Green Tea May Decrease After Long Storage

March 19, 2009

Green tea leaves produce antioxidative organic compounds, called catechins, that are reported to have beneficial health effects such as fighting bacteria, viruses and cancer. But consumers need to be aware of possible adverse consequences of long-term storage of commercial tea brands, say researchers Mendel Friedman and Carol E. Levin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Western Regional Research Center in Albany, California, and S.U. Lee and N. Kozukue of Uiduk University in Korea, in an article in the Read the rest of this entry »


Breast Cancer Risk Rapidly Declined After Women Stopped Taking Postmenopausal Combined Hormone Therapy

February 6, 2009

Women who stopped taking the postmenopausal hormone combination of estrogen plus progestin experienced a marked decline in breast cancer risk which was unrelated to mammography utilization change, according to a study from the Women’s Health Initiative led by a Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) investigator.

The study, based on data from the Women’s Health Initiative, will be published Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine. Read the rest of this entry »


Seventeen Months After Cord Blood Transplant – Child Is Free Of Signs Of Cancer

January 19, 2009

A two year old child from Florida is free of signs of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), a very rare form of pediatric leukemia, seventeen months after receiving a transplant with cord blood from the National Cord Blood Program (NCBP) of the New York Blood Center’s Howard P. Milstein National Cord Blood Center.

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia generally affects children under the age of five and comprises less than one percent of infant leukemias. The prognosis for JMML is generally poor and most children with JMML die before reaching the age of three.
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